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MySikhSense.com
Dialogue for those who dare.
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Television now in color!

One Skin, Different Perspectives
"There needs to be a conversational relationship
between white eyes and colored eyes in America."


White Eyes                              Colored Eyes

"Looking at the one and only Black family in 3HO/Sikh Dharma
after 48 years
from my perspective as a person of color I have to
ask, why are there so few Blacks, e.g., how many White Sikh families
versus Black Sikh families after 48 years? Oh sure, there are a few
African Americans
, but they are disproportionately represented.
Think about the optics from the perspective of most people of color.
Do people of color see this disparity as a positive or as a negative?
And how many Black Kundalini Yoga teachers-trainers are there?"

"Question is, are we mature enough to sit down and
discuss issues of diversity, including religion and race?"

"Are there even occasional conversations between White eyes and
Colored eyes regarding the issues of diversity and racism and
their impact and complexities within the American community today?
Issues to do with diversity are not going away just because we deny
their existence, or because they cause us discomfort to discuss. We
must promote pluralism as did Guru Nanak throughout his ministry."

"The human mind was created to discriminate, e.g., make choices between
up and down, in and out, black and white, etc. We must remain aware of our
tendency to use our discretionary abilities in order to marginalize and repress
people with whom we differ. We need to constantly see to it that we advocate for
pluralism, against tribalism, in the interest of justice as taught by Guru Nanak Dev.
Our choices are to live for each other, or to live at each other." Hari Singh Bird Khalsa

*"In 2013, the population of African Americans, including those of more than one race,
was estimated at 45 million, making up 15.2% of the total U.S. population." Source.
U.S. organizations should therefore reflect about 15 African Americans out of every 100.

Join the conversation!
Dialogue, not monologues.

My Sikh Sense
By S.S. SatHanuman Singh Khalsa


SatHanuman Singh Khalsa

Jaano Jot Na Puucho, Jaati Aagai Jaat Na Hai
"Recognize the Divine light within all, and do not consider social
class or status; there are no classes or castes, hereafter." Guru Nanak

"The best love is to serve all equally." Siri Singh Sahib of Sikh Dharma

Conscious or Care-less Living?

Sat Nam. I have an inquiry.... Since Yogi Harbhajan Singh Puri, aka Yogi Bhajan, came to the states in 1968, formed 3HO in January of 1969 (8 months before Woodstock Music Festival in upstate New York), taught Kundalini Yoga and facilitated White Tantric Yoga, opened the Dwara (door) to the Shabd Guru, and put forth a morning spiritual discipline (Sadhana), why 48 years later, are we dealing with the lack of understanding, prejudice, bigotry, fear, tremendous separation between 'rich' and 'poor'? It would appear if this so-called Dharmic Path was practiced and the Soul was exalted, the five demons, Lust, Anger, Greed, Pride, Attachment, would be transmuted and we, as a 'family', would live in Chardee Kalaa.

Ranbir Singh wrote an opinion on how minorities should NOT complain but fight for their rights. I guess he was only 9 years old, living in India, when the Civil Rights Movement in America was in progress. I was 14, 15 when the right to vote was enforced by the Voting Rights act in 1965. I lived in the deep south from 1966-1970. I watched men and women fight for their rights to exist, to live, to prosper, to simply pursue their happiness. People didn't complain, they stood heroically in harms way, while police beat them, and children were murdered in the Church were they worshiped. (BTW: I suggest everyone see "SELMA"!)

"Whenever people start to feel satisfaction even after wealth is earned
and achieved, the satisfaction remains fleeting, cancer of ingratitude sets
in and it starts to devour the Spirit and Soul of a man. No religion or faith in
other will satisfy unless you experience it daily within yourself as you inhale the
breath into your lungs, and when you exhale, it's a sigh of relief." Ranbir Singh Bhai

In 1865. the 13th Amendment was passed and 'slavery' was abolished. The next 100 years were hell for people of color. In the first 20 years of the 20th Century the Ku Klux Klan flourished not only in Mississippi and the "old Confederacy" but all across America, including California, Oregon, across the Northern states as well.

Unlike South Africa, there has never been a healing between Blacks and Caucasian people. No forgiveness, no process of acceptance of 'White privilege'. This nation has been living in fear and entitlement for 400 years. There has never been reconciliation.

"You're not going to solve the problem if it's not being talked about."
President Barack Obama on subject of race, December 19, 2014.

"Are there even occasional conversations between White eyes
and Colored eyes regarding the issues of diversity and racism and
their impact and complexities within our American communities today?"

"Issues to do with diversity are not going away just because we
deny their existence, or because they cause us discomfort to discuss.
We must promote pluralism as did Guru Nanak throughout his ministry."

"Discourse about racism is not meant to stir up feelings of guilt.
Discourse is meant to drive people to action against injustice.
Question is, are we mature enough to sit down and discuss issues
of diversity, including religion, gender and race?"
Hari Singh Bird

Just three years after the Civil Rights laws were passed to protect the disenfranchised, a Yogi, a Sikh, brought technology to the West and to the youth, regardless of their hue. Now, almost five decades later we see yoga teachers carving out territories, staking claims like gold prospectors in 1849 in California. Instead of meeting the challenge of this great Teacher to be the "Lighthouse" we market his image to put money in our own pockets. We market his name. We see men and women with turbans, calling themselves Khalsa, acting like they are entitled to inherit the prosperity brought about by hard work, commitment and lost hours of sleep.

I declare that most of us don't do our Sadhana, don't see God in All, but only pay lip service to that intent. We put on Bana like its a suit when it suits us, and accumulate property and wealth while denying our own youth (ages 22-40) the right to lead. How old were we (seniors) in 1969, 1972, 1980? Yes, we give young people positions in our businesses, if their station, status and family fortunes position them either by marriage or inheritance.

There is no way on this God's Green and Blue planet Earth, after two score and 6 years we, of this Dharma known as Khalsa, could still act out our parents neurosis if we had meditated and raised our Kundalini, chanting the Lord's Name. (???) All of this flowery talk, "Holy speech", yet the proof is in the 'putting'. We need to practice what we teach.

Hari Singh Bird has asked the question, why only one African-American family exists in 3HO/Sikh Dharma since 1969 (48) years? Why, when this Spiritual Path has all the technology to uplift and elevate the Spirit?

Too much emphasis has been placed on making lots and lots of money and not enough on the diversity of true prosperity, and real wealth. That wealth is Bani, Bana, Simran, Seva.

Wahe Guru Ji Ka Khalsa Wahe Guru Ji Ki Fateh! --

Your thoughts can be posted here.

My Sikh Sense
By S.S. SatHanuman Singh Khalsa


SatHanuman Singh Khalsa

My reply to a friend re my commentary above.

Sat Nam. Unlike Punjabi and other INDIA-born SIKHS, we Western adoptees, brought Judeo-Christian baggage. Most SIKHS have never done White Tantric Yoga, or a daily Sadhana, including Banis. Most don't wear the Bana of Siri Guru Gobind Singh Ji, or have not taken Amrit Pahul. Most have never taught or lived a Spiritual path. Most, not all are culturally Punjabi SIKHS more than Dharmic SIKHS. Most have not integrated with non-Punjabis or South Asians when immigrating outside native India.

It appears from my observations, that the one segment of Khalsa who get it are the Malaysian Sikhs who learned what we (3HO/Sikh Dharma) were taught 48 years ago. They are distant in generations from their Punjabi roots, practice Dharma, including Sadhana and Kundalini Yoga. They acknowledge Siri Singh Sahib JI as their Teacher and have taken the Technology taught to them, and they live it. They and other non-White cultures who do not have the baggage of "White Privilege" weighing upon their Soul will resurrect Siri Guru Nanak Dev Ji's Dharma.

3HO/Sikh Dharma is a small frog swimming in a pond while others are conquering the World Ocean. More.



 

More MySikhSense.com

                                          

                                 

See SensitivitySummit.com. See Desmond Tutu's Plea To Israel.
See The Homeless Banned And Jailed In 'Christian' America.
See Let's Have 'The Race Conversation' For Real, This Time.
See More Diversity Dialogues. See Institutionalized Racism.

See Required Reading. See Recommended Reading.
See Why Are White Tantra Yoga Classes So 'White'?

See Islamic Extremism vs Christian Extremism.

See A Native American's Thanksgiving Rebuke.
See What White People Need To Know.

See Americans Need To Pay Attention.
See What's Wrong With This Picture?
See A Case Of Unjust Enrichment.
See A Classic Case of Tribalism.
See What Tribalism Looks Like.
See Guidelines For Facilitators.
See For The People Of Color.
See What Is White Privilege?
See KRI Needs To Go To Jail.
See Jon Stewart On Racism.
See The Ubuntu Philosophy.
See TheMahanTantric.com.
See Example of Tribalism.

See ACT For Diversity.
See Comments Con.
See Comments Pro.

See Obama 43 To 1.
See My Main Point.
See Definitions.
See Questions.

My Sikh Sense
By S.S. SatHanuman Singh Khalsa


SatHanuman Singh Khalsa

Sat Nam. As a human being and a Sikh of the Guru, I feel empathy for victims of all hate crime. Sikhs have suffered many incidents of torture, mutilation, hangings and death at the hands of hateful people of Mughal, British, Indian and now, American cultures.

This has taken place for 350 years since the time of our Guru's. In the US, slavery and Apartheid have existed since the 1600's. There are parallels. But here's where the petal meets the road. The 10th Guru established the Khalsa to stand out and stand up. I've seen very little of that since 1984. Many Indian immigrants have migrated to the West (Britain-Canada-U.S.) and many men have shaven, cut their Kesh, wear baseball hats and used Anglo-nicknames instead of the name blessed by the Guru.

I can understood this happening 30 years ago, I feel like it's just an excuse, today.

We speak of U.S. born adopted, so-called White Sikhs who donned the turban, grew their beard, and even took Amrit, who have left Dharmic life and whose children have done similarly.

Well, Siri Singh Sahibji once said speaking to the 'White Sikhs':

"You can always cut your hair, take off your turban and quite. No Black can do that. He stands out and cannot take off the 'color' of his or her skin."

This is known as White Privilege! So, what I've seen and experienced here in the U.S. over the past 50 years is that Blacks are the only group who were organized, non-violent, and dedicated to Civil and Human Rights. Whites even followed and joined later, but it was the oppressed descendants of Slavery who lead the way. Watch the film -- The Great Debaters, based on true story of young Blacks growing up in Texas in the 1930s who would end up debating the Harvard Debate Team in Cambridge Massachusetts. The "Massacre of Amritsar" is referenced not by the 'White Privileged' Harvard students, but by descendants of slavery!

I come from both worlds. The world of the 1950s-60s as an American, I have White privilege but I keep my Kesh, my Daastar, beard and commitment knowing as a Sikh, I am obligated to fight for the oppressed and to walk the path of Equality and Justice.

So, as we hope Justice will come to the victims of the post-1984 attacks on Sikhs in India, we see injustice happening today in New York, Missouri, Ohio, Michigan to African American males killed by police, too. Innocent, unarmed Black boys are murdered by the very people sworn to serve and protect.

I bet if we taught yoga in prisons to young Black men and they learned of Sikh history, this would inspire them, too! But, except for M.S.S. Krishna Kaur, we no longer do this to much extent.

I agree with Hari Singh, African American men and women would naturally be attracted to the Guru as many White hippies were 48 years ago. The difference is if there was balance and equality within 3HO and Sikh Dharma, they would find a home and lead. I bet most wouldn't hide as their White counterparts have in the past. Why? Because they cannot. --

Your thoughts can be posted here.

My Sikh Sense
By Supreet Singh Manchanda


Supreet Singh Manchanda

Manifesting Khalsa Raj

In the days of old, there used to be fiefdoms or kingdoms. There were kings and subjects. In the implicit contract, the subjects paid taxes and swore loyalty and the king protected and cared for them. A symbiotic relationship.

As an example, Maharaja Ranjit Singh was one of the most enlightened Maharajas in India. During his rule, people of different castes, cultures and faiths worked together. There was no death penalty. He created a secular kingdom, even though he was a Sikh. His motto came straight from the teachings of the Guru: “All will be free here.” The kingdom became expansive and prosperous. It stretched from Peshawar to New Delhi and was a land of literacy, knowledge, art, music and poetry. The Moguls who propagated Islam before had banned all of that, but under Maharaja Ranjit Singh, these disciplines flourished again creating a renaissance in India.


Maharaja Ranjit Singh

But that was a particular time where a single man could rule with values and with a vision. Today, this type of kingdom is no longer possible. Yet, as Sikhs, everyday we say Raj Karega Khalsa. Translated - the Khalsa will rule and all will be safe in its fold.

What does this mean today? How can it become real?

First we have to recognize, in a Khalsa Raj, from its beginning and in its design, everybody is an equal part of it. Discriminatory behavior like the caste/class system, racism, or misogyny, have to be abandoned. When we Sikhs talk of humanity - we say Sarbat - it means all. In reality, we should reach out to strive to make sure everybody is included in this Raj and no one is left behind. In order to manifest this Raj, we need to bring Sarbat to the forefront. (See Guru Nanak's Message.)

Why one asks? Well, our Sikh values are universal. Therefore, our behavior has to be universal and always for the sarbat. When we each live these values, it goes to the hearts of the people around us.

Our pillars are “Kirit Karna” Working hard honestly and without exploitation. “Vand Chakna” Sharing equally with others and “Naam Japna” of calling upon the Divine in ourselves and in each other. These pillars lend themselves naturally to this democratic Raj.


Sikh Soldier in U.S. Army

The Khalsa will not succeed just because of how we look. I don't mean that we do not wear turbans or bana. What I mean is that our success won’t depend upon our skin color or creed or even our turbans. We will succeed because of how we behave. Then our unique look will create the association, “Those turbaned people are like this: "They embody nobility with compassion, dignity, justice, and grace. They can serve me." And then it will be said with appreciation.

In that way, each Sikh becomes a unique ambassador of the Raj. Each and every one of us. Source. -- See Military Generals Letter To U.S. Defense Secretary.

POINTS TO PONDER

"From 1789 to 2009, one African American out of forty-four Presidents of
the United States and even fewer First Americans." Obama43To1.com

"Since the election of President Obama many Americans claim to be weary
of the ongoing conversation about racism. Think about the weariness of
people of color who have waited for centuries for substantive discourse
to occur. That conversation has only just begun." Obama43To1.com

My Sikh Sense
By Ravitej Singh Khalsa


Ravitej Singh Khalsa

Sat Nam. One aspect of not seeing the fuss (about diversity in 3HO/Sikh Dharma) is TV. Netflix. Movies. Sports. Media. How much has Shonda Rhimes done for normalizing that everyone is equal. Whether one appreciates the shows, Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal are very popular and go beyond color, gender, orientation, etc. Get away with Murder – Viola Davis as a lawyer. Alfre Woodard as a tough US President in State of affairs.

These shows are being watched because they are so well done. Will Smith is the king of Hollywood. Oprah the Queen. Denzel Washington the most handsome man on Earth (Time Magazine). Dwayne Johnson is Hercules. Cuba Gooding can’t do wrong. Samual L. Jackson has done more movies than anyone else. Kerry Washington redefined what a desirable, capable and self contained woman is. So did Shonda.

Remember Fifth Element with Bruce Willis? Take a look at that again. Talk about “integration.” Mr. Science (the new Carl Sagan) is a different shade of color. Morgan Freeman is God (and Nelson Mandela). So many movies, the bad guy is light and the hero is darker. Does that send a message to the new gens?

These new kids are growing up with these new media heroes. They are athletes who sound intelligent. Top movies, music and TV entertainers. CEO of MacDonalds. CEO of Master Card is a turban wearing Sikh. They are confident. Looked up to as roll models. And oh yeah, they are different shades, but that doesn’t seem to matter as much. In fact, it’s the new beautiful. Remember back when. Black is beautiful was a theme for awhile. Maybe shades of brown, color, texture, shapes are more appealing than bleached out due to migration to northern climes. Black kids on the Internet are certainly sounding more intelligent and confidently posting. My observation is that Black, Dark, etc. may actually be more intelligent, capable, creative and beautiful than White. Maybe White is jealous or afraid of the power. And maybe for a last little while Whites have gotten away with something that just isn’t true.

Diversity Network


Siri Singh Sahib said it would take 3 generations to even get it.

We have to keep up to make sure it doesn’t slip. But I think the folks who want things to stay the same, or have any concept that all are not equal are the old that is dying. Armageddonville may simply be about those who get on board the Aquarian express or die with the sinking of the Piscean. Transition periods are often called “interesting times.” And thought of later as hard spots. We have being doing business the same for 4,000 years. Hard to take that left turn. And things were real different 15,000 years ago.

Siri Singh Sahib said it would take 3 generations to even get it. Us old folks were note takers. We put it down on paper. And the next gen is digitizing it. The next will teach how to live it. And we had a part to play. If one stayed aware and observant, it’s been as we said in the beginning of all this “a real trip.” I love watching how it’s all unfolding. Just as it should be doing.

It’s all about being who you are. Staying confident. And serving. Being in people's faces. Or at least their vision. Being heroes. Showing up. Assuming leadership. Standing up. Letting people know what reality might be. Being courageous. And fearless. Joining up. Keeping up.

And remembering the great cosmic giggle.

Ha! Rant for the day, eh? More.

Your thoughts can be posted here.

My Sikh Sense
By Tapasleen Kaur


Tapasleen Kaur

"Sikhism rejects caste and class systems."

The word Sikh means ‘disciple’ or ‘learner.’ The Sikh religion was founded in the fifteenth century by Guru Nanak Dev Ji.

Sikhism is monotheistic and stresses the equality of all men and women. Sikhs believe in three basic principles; meditating on the name of God (praying), earning a living by honest means as well as sharing the fruits of one’s labor with others. Sikhism rejects caste and class systems and emphasizes service to humanity. Turbans are worn to cover our long hair and with respect to God. The Sikh faith teaches us the humanitarian principles of freedom, equality, and justice. There are about 25 million Sikhs in the world. Sikhs have been in the United States for over 100 years. Sikhism recognizes the universal truths that underlie all human endeavors, religions and belief systems. The universal nature of the Sikh way of life reaches out to people of all faiths and cultural backgrounds, encouraging us to see beyond our differences (diversity and inclusion) and to work together for world peace and harmony.

A Sikh is a man of love, equality and peace. They protect belong to all religions and races. Their Turban is their crown, uniform, a Symbol against supression. 83000 Sikhs soldiers died fighting in the World wars! Sikhs are by far the community which has Lowest number of people imprisoned. They are not criminals or terrorists. They are Law abiding citizens. 58000 Gurdwaras prepare 6 Million meals a day (for all who come). It's in their blood to fight against tyranny. Their Gurus gave his life so that everyone could practice his faith with freedom.

Sikhism is a practical religion and Sikhs are a pragmatic people. The emphasis is on leading a worldly, successful life as a householder and a contributing member of society, but with the mind attuned to an awareness of God. Sikhism rejects all distinctions based on caste, creed, gender, color, race, or national origin (pluralism). For Sikhs, God is not found in isolation or by renouncing the world, but is attained as an active family member and member of one’s community. The word “Sikh” means student. Therefore, a Sikh is and remains a student of the meaning of life. (Note: The Sikh Turban signifies the wearer to be a student.)

The Sikh faith is committed to the equality of women, and necessarily so, as it defines God as gender neutral, perhaps one of the few major world religions to do so. There is no activity in a Gurdwara or within the community that is permitted to a man but not to a woman. There is no religious function from which women are barred at any time of their lives. Sikh spirituality is centered around this need to understand and experience God, and eventually become one with God.

The Sikh Gurus promoted all human beings as one and the same, and they are all above discrimination. The Gurus showed real love for all of humanity. Muslims were equally dear to them as Hindus, or any others.

It is well known that Bhai Mardana a Muslim, spent his whole adult life with Guru Nanak, accompanying the Guru with his Rabab as a musician and the Guru’s closest companion everywhere that the Guru went.

The foundation of Harmandir Sahib in Amritsar – the premier Sikh shrine, was laid by a Muslim saint Hazrat Mian Mir. Guru Arjun Dev incorporated in Guru Granth Sahib – the Sikh Holy Book, hymns of God-oriented saints – both Hindus as well as Muslims. Hymns of any saint that found a place in this Holy Book, are honored like those of the Gurus, and every Sikh bows equally in reverence to all of them.

The Sikh faith is a faith of learning and spiritual self-improvement; of dialogue; of intellectual evolution and certainly not of “conversion”; a person becomes a Sikh by choice and certainly not by compulsion or with inducements or incentives or by any other devices. It is a truly interfaith approach to religion undertaken in a way where the universal unity of the human spirit is honored. Sikhs promoted interfaith principles when the word ‘interfaith’ did not exist! --

Your thoughts can be posted here.

"From 1789 to 2009, one African American out of forty-four Presidents of
the United States and even fewer First Americans." Obama43To1.com

My Sikh Sense
By S.S. Ek Ong Kaar Kaur Khalsa


Ek Ong Kaar Kaur Khalsa

Journey of the Soul into the Blue Ethers

Sat Nam. Death happens when the breath stops. The physical body no longer has any power to move or to grow, and it begins to decay. The subtle consciousness of the Soul begins to separate from the physical body. But for the first 3-4 days, the consciousness can "hang out" around the body. It may have some kind of attachment still - to the body and to the life. What Yogi Bhajan calls "Privileged Souls" have a chance to travel around and say good-bye to those they love, or to visit places that are sacred to them before they leave the Earth plane.

In either event, the subtle consciousness maintains a connection to the physical body in those first few days. This is why, in the Sikh tradition, we cremate the body and chant Akal. To help the Soul let go of its attachment to the physical life it had and to be willing to move on.

The next part of the 17 days, the Soul has to cross the electromagnetic field of the Earth and begin its journey into the realm of the Blue Ethers. There are four levels of the Blue Ethers before one experiences absolute and perfect Union with the Divine. Those who have a spiritual teacher or guide get help at this point.

The First Blue Ether is where the assessment takes place. What were you sent for? How did you do? We all judge ourselves instantly at the time of death. The First Blue Ether allows a Soul a chance to really sit and re-evaluate. In fact, if there are lessons that did not get finished during life, the Soul has a chance, during the 17 days, to complete those lessons under his or her spiritual guide. This completion of the lessons takes place either in the first or Second Blue Ether, depending on the ripeness of the Soul. In the First Blue Ether, the Soul can purify itself. In the Second Blue Ether, it can continue to get deeper learning.

If the Soul graduates to the Second Blue Ether, it also has a chance to become a guide for other Souls. It can reach out from that place and help others.

The Third Blue Ether is the most refined ether that the human being can access while alive. Deep meditation can open us up to the Third Blue Ether. The Third Blue Ether is the realm of the master and the angel. So while alive, people who develop the consciousness of a master or an angel have penetrated through to the Third Blue Ether with their meditative mind.

In the process of death, such a Soul could navigate those first two ethers fairly easily during the 17 days, and may end up at the Third Blue Ether if it has truly completed all its lessons. The Third Blue Ether is the realm of the realized, enlightened Soul. A Soul, which can reach out and touch other Souls to guide them in the past, present or future. A Soul that graduates to the Third Blue Ether has a choice to make. That Soul can decide to reincarnate again - for the purpose of serving humanity. Or it could choose to go onto the Fourth Blue Ether and just be Pure Radiance. But such a Soul will never reincarnate on Earth again once it enters the Fourth Blue Ether.

The Fourth Blue Ether is reserved for those incredible amazing Lights that guide humanity with their pure radiance. Like Guru Nanak. Like Christ. Like Buddha. Like Yogi Bhajan. These Souls will never take form again. But their consciousness is so clear and so realized, that they radiate from the Fourth Blue Ether across the centuries giving guidance, hope and love to humanity.

After the Fourth Blue Ether, there is just Pure Union. No separation. Absolute Oneness. And that is the end of the Soul's journey across time and space.

During the 17 days - the process is:

. Can the Soul detach from the body within the first few days? Can it penetrate through the electro-magnetic field of the Earth and begin to experience the Blue Ethers? The chanting we do and the chanting the Soul does helps it through this initial process.

. Does the Soul have a guide to help on the journey through the Blue Ethers?

. Are there lessons that the Soul did not finish in life that it can finish during the 17 days under the guidance of its spiritual teacher in the Blue Ethers?

. Which Blue Ether do Souls eventually come to rest in? The First Blue Ether - they are already deciding their next incarnation based on their debts and the lessons they still have to learn.

. The Second Blue Ether - Souls are learning deep lessons, they are guiding others, and will come back when the time is right.

. The Third Blue Ether - Souls are realized beings and simply there to support and guide others. Souls choose whether to come back to guide others in the form of a Human, or go on to the Fourth Blue Ether and provide guidance in the way of Light, Love and their Presence.

. The Fourth Blue Ether - Souls are so realized that they never take form, again. Their Light is so huge - it creates guidance for other Souls across a vast range of time.

. Merged.

This is my best understanding today of this process."

More Death And The Blue Ethers
From The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan

“When your mind will be dead, it won’t think or imagine. The mind will go to the Universal Mind. The physical body – all the five tattvas – go to the five tattvas. The auric body will go to the light. The pranic body will go to the prana. But the subtle body will carry the Soul and shall progress to the Blue Ethers. It is a conscious act.” Yogi Bhajan April 2, 1981

“It takes many thousands and hundreds of thousand of years, trillions of years, for this Soul to come out of the Third Blue Ether. It is not a small thing. A spot of earth waits millions of years for the one day a man of God will put his foot on it. It takes thousands of years for a mountain to get the wind to work and create a little cave where a man of God will take shelter for a minute. It’s a whole planning.” Yogi Bhajan July 11, 1975

What kind of body a man shall have, what kind of destiny and fate shall challenge it – is all performed at the stage called the Third Blue Ether.” Yogi Bhajan July 9, 1990

More Notes From ®The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan

The Soul begins its journey from the Third Blue Ether.

In meditation, we can journey to the Third Blue Ether.

The First Blue Ether is to purify. “The receptivity of the cleansing of the Soul to get ready to go back.” (3/22/1982) “Where the Soul goes for purification.” (7/9/1990.)

The Second Blue Ether is to get guidance or to guide. “The receptivity of the cleansing to be there and to supervise all other promising Souls.” (3/22/1983) “Rest and get ready and the account is settled.” (7/9/1990)

The Third Blue Ether is to become a realized being. “The light of the Soul which has to vibrate to relate to all Souls, future of that past and that of now, to be liberated.” (3/22/1983) “Where transmission to project out or project in is decided.” (7/9/1990)

The Fourth Blue Ether is to become a super guide from the most Infinite, radiant aspect of consciousness – and it is not on the Earth. “The lighted Self.” (3/22/1983). “It’s the Fourth Blue Ether from where the Soul never returns.” (7/9/1990)

The Fifth Blue Ether is Union. “God, Itself.” (3/22/1983).

Additional Comments

"Here's a note from some quotes and notes I have in my files on Death and the Blue Ethers from the Siri Singh Sahib, aka Yogi Bhajan.

If you want to energetically understand the Blue Ethers, you can especially meditate on the 34-37th Paurees of Japji Sahib, which are Guru Nanak's descriptions of these realms." S.S. Aftab Singh Khalsa

See More On Blue Ethers. See YouAreTheEssence.com.

See EkOngKarSatNamSiriWhaHeGuru.com.

My Sikh Sense
By Sendhil Mullainathan


Sendhil Mullainathan

Racial Bias, Even When We Have Good Intentions

The deaths of African-Americans at the hands of the police in Ferguson, Mo., in Cleveland and on Staten Island have reignited a debate about race. Some argue that these events are isolated and that racism is a thing of the past. Others contend that they are merely the tip of the iceberg, highlighting that skin color still has a huge effect on how people are treated.

Arguments about race are often heated and anecdotal. As a social scientist, I naturally turn to empirical research for answers. As it turns out, an impressive body of research spanning decades addresses just these issues — and leads to some uncomfortable conclusions and makes us look at this debate from a different angle.

The central challenge of such research is isolating the effect of race from other factors. For example, we know African-Americans earn less income, on average, than Whites. Maybe that is evidence that employers discriminate against them. But maybe not. We also know African-Americans tend to be stuck in neighborhoods with worse schools, and perhaps that — and not race directly — explains the wage gap. If so, perhaps policy should focus on place rather than race, as some argue.

But we can isolate the effect of race to some degree. A study I conducted in 2003 with Marianne Bertrand, an economist at the University of Chicago, illustrates how. We mailed thousands of résumés to employers with job openings and measured which ones were selected for callbacks for interviews. But before sending them, we randomly used stereotypically African-American names (such as “Jamal”) on some and stereotypically White names (like “Brendan”) on others.

The same résumé was roughly 50 percent more likely to result in callback for an interview if it had a “White” name. Because the résumés were statistically identical, any differences in outcomes could be attributed only to the factor we manipulated: the names.

Other studies have also examined race and employment. In a 2009 study, Devah Pager, Bruce Western and Bart Bonikowski, all now sociologists at Harvard, sent actual people to apply for low-wage jobs. They were given identical résumés and similar interview training. Their sobering finding was that African-American applicants with no criminal record were offered jobs at a rate as low as White applicants who had criminal records.

These kinds of methods have been used in a variety of research, especially in the last 20 years. Here are just some of the general findings:

When doctors were shown patient histories and asked to make judgments about heart disease, they were much less likely to recommend cardiac catheterization (a helpful procedure) to Black patients — even when their medical files were statistically identical to those of White patients.

When Whites and Blacks were sent to bargain for a used car, Blacks were offered initial prices roughly $700 higher, and they received far smaller concessions.

Several studies found that sending emails with stereotypically Black names in response to apartment-rental ads on Craigslist elicited fewer responses than sending ones with White names. A regularly repeated study by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development sent African-Americans and Whites to look at apartments and found that African-Americans were shown fewer apartments to rent and houses for sale.

White state legislators were found to be less likely to respond to constituents with African-American names. This was true of legislators in both political parties.

Emails sent to faculty members at universities, asking to talk about research opportunities, were more likely to get a reply if a stereotypically White name was used.

Even eBay auctions were not immune. When iPods were auctioned on eBay, researchers randomly varied the skin color on the hand holding the iPod. A White hand holding the iPod received 21 percent more offers than a Black hand.

The criminal justice system — the focus of current debates — is harder to examine this way. One study, though, found a clever method. The pools of people from which jurors are chosen are effectively random. Analyzing this natural experiment revealed that an all-White jury was 16 percentage points more likely to convict a Black defendant than a White one, but when a jury had one Black member, it convicted both at the same rate.

I could go on, but hopefully the sheer breadth of these findings impresses you, as it did me.

There are some counterexamples: Data show that some places, like elite colleges, most likely do favor minority applicants. But this evidence underlies that a helping hand in one area does not preclude harmful shoves in many other areas, including ignored résumés, unhelpful faculty members and reluctant landlords.

But this widespread discrimination is not necessarily a sign of widespread conscious prejudice.

When our own résumé study came out, many human-resources managers told us they were stunned. They prized creating diversity in their companies, yet here was evidence that they were doing anything but. How was that possible?

To use the language of the psychologist Daniel Kahneman, we think both fast and slow. When deciding what iPod to buy or which résumé to pursue, we weigh a few factors deliberately (“slow”). But for hundreds of other factors, we must rely on intuitive judgment — and we weigh these unconsciously (“fast”).

Even if, in our slow thinking, we work to avoid discrimination, it can easily creep into our fast thinking. Our snap judgments rely on all the associations we have — from fictional television shows to news reports. They use stereotypes, both the accurate and the inaccurate, both those we would want to use and ones we find repulsive.

We can’t articulate why one seller’s iPod photograph looks better; dozens of factors shape this snap judgment — and we might often be distraught to realize some of them. If we could make a slower, deliberate judgment we would use some of these factors (such as the quality of the photo), but ignore others (such as the color of the hand holding the iPod). But many factors escape our consciousness.

This kind of discrimination — crisply articulated in a 1995 article by the psychologists Mahzarin Banaji of Harvard and Anthony Greenwald of the University of Washington — has been studied by dozens of researchers who have documented implicit bias outside of our awareness.

The key to “fast thinking” discrimination is that we all share it. Good intentions do not guarantee immunity. One study published in 2007 asked subjects in a video-game simulation to shoot at people who were holding a gun. (Some were criminals; some were innocent bystanders.) African-Americans were shot at a higher rate, even those who were not holding guns.

Ugly pockets of conscious bigotry remain in this country, but most discrimination is more insidious. The urge to find and call out the bigot is powerful, and doing so is satisfying. But it is also a way to let ourselves off the hook. Rather than point fingers outward, we should look inward — and examine how, despite best intentions, we discriminate in ways big and small. -- See Cognitive Dissonance.

Sendhil Mullainathan is a professor of economics at Harvard.

"Looking at the one and only Black family in 3HO/Sikh Dharma
after 48 years
from my perspective as a person of color I have to
ask, why are there so few Blacks, e.g., how many White Sikh families
versus Black Sikh families after 48 years? Oh sure, there are a few
African Americans
, but they are disproportionately represented.
Think about the optics from the perspective of most people of color.
Do people of color see this disparity as a positive or as a negative?
And how many Black Kundalini Yoga teachers-trainers are there?"

"It's obvious, given the Awtar Singh Khalsa family being the
only all Black family in 3HO/Sikh Dharma after 48 years,
that a more acceptable and effective way needs to be found to
relate to marginalized populations in order to be consistent with
the teachings of Guru Nanak. I suggest taking his message to the
prisons where marginalized people are." Hari Singh Bird Khalsa

"From 1789 to 2009, one African American out of forty-four Presidents of
the United States and even fewer First Americans." Obama43To1.com

"Since the election of President Obama many Americans claim to be weary
of the ongoing conversation about racism. Think about the weariness of
people of color who have waited for centuries for substantive discourse
to occur. That conversation has only just begun." Obama43To1.com

My Sikh Sense
By Steven W. Thrasher


Steven W. Thrasher

"The War Machine is beyond the reach of civil government and easily
tramples individual Souls, especially when they inhabit bodies of color."

The War Machine is the violent nexus of military and economic forces that grinds us up to perpetuate itself. With politicians of all stripes in its pockets and buoyed by lobbyists, the War Machine is beyond the reach of civil government and easily tramples individual Souls, especially when they inhabit bodies of color. War is a big, multi-trillion-dollar business, requiring the sales, construction and operation of guns, drones, missiles, governmental armies, private armies, public prisons, private prisons and the like.

While the War Machine has been operated most obviously overseas in places like the Middle East, and domestically behind bars, it is now increasingly clear that the War Machine is also operating on America’s streets.

The War Machine has always made for strange bedfellows. Even as the conflict in Afghanistan, America’s longest foreign war, ostensibly ends, America’s largest police department and its union are in sometimes open conflict against their civilian commander, supported by a right wing that normally hates public unions.


Cops turn their backs on Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Mayor de Blasio is married to a Black woman.

The NYPD’s beef with its chief? That Mayor Bill de Blasio merely said he had “the talk” about police that all parents of Black boys have with their sons. My father had it with me, as did every parent of every Black person I know. But the War Machine will accept no criticism, ever: not for torturing brown people overseas, nor for making brown children fear police at home.

Beware she who dares to speak out at such times. When a Fox affiliate selectively edits the words of Baltimore protester Tawanda Jones to make it sound as if she said “kill a cop” when she did not, it is an example of how the War Machine hates dissent. Speech feels as under assault now as it did after 9/11, because it’s one thing for the press to express its belief, however misguided, that the exercise of free speech isn’t warranted. But it should be another for government officials to declare if, when and how dissent is appropriate. In 2001, George W Bush’s press secretary, Ari Fleischer, once warned “all Americans need to watch what they say, watch what they do”; in 2014, de Blasio declared after the shooting of two police officers that it was time to “put aside political debates, put aside protests”. Protest and dissent scare the War Machine.

Moments of crisis are a prime time to sell fear, and “patriotic” policy, and guns. Demanding considerations of peace leading up to a foreign war threaten those sales. Demanding a consideration of the 1,100 people killed by American policelast year, even after two police officers have been killed, may similarly threaten the standard narrative – and that’s why it’s so important for protesters to keep forcing this conversation, about real lives and real justice and real reform, right now.

Because Washington won’t. Our national consciousness may now be raised about the dangers of arming of our local police departments with military-grade weapons after citizens across the nation demanded that Black lives, indeed, matter. Our eyes may have been opened to torture committed by our military. But neither the "right" nor the “left” in Washington have any plans to punish the torturers – nor stem the flow of military equipment intended for use against civilians into Ferguson, Brooklyn and beyond – anytime soon.

I watched, with horror, as the mother of Antonio Martin realized live on Ustream that her son had just been shot by police, I thought to myself, “The War Machine will be gunning for her next.” It will blame her for being the cause of police violence against Black bodies, and not examine the context in which that violence occurred. The War Machine does not want us as a society to ask of ourselves the difficult questions about why it is that Black people, abroad and at home, have been kept in the margins and away from economic opportunity, employment, education and safety. It prefers that we maintain the status quo and uncritically support the state, no matter how violent and oppressive.

When I watched, with horror, as the mother of Antonio Martin realized live on Ustream that her son had just been shot by police, I thought to myself, “The War Machine will be gunning for her next.” It will blame her for being the cause of police violence against Black bodies, and not examine the context in which that violence occurred.

The War Machine will say, at best, that the answer to such violence against civilians is merely technological, because driving up the sale of body-cams and more guns is what it does so well. But, more likely, the War Machine will want to make an example of Antonio Martin’s mother: that she and her son are a good excuse for more surveillance of Black bodies, even though we know over-policing does not reduce crime.

Of course, the War Machine doesn’t care particularly about Black mothers or Black women. The story of a deranged man from Georgia going on a shooting spree has been entirely about the death of two police officers in New York, and hardly at all about the shooting of Shaneka Thompson in Baltimore. Similarly, the War Machine doesn’t care especially about Officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos as individuals; like Ismaaiyl Brinsley did, it just sees them as cops. To the War Machine, violence must repeat itself: that’s why those officers’ deaths are being heralded as an occasion to suspend dissent – as a moment of “grieving, not grievance” – and not as a time to question American violence overall.

The Black Lives Matter movement is about more than just justice for our deaths -- it's about a depreciation of Black life.

The War Machine has always had an insatiable need for bodies of color from before the birth of this nation. The genocide of Native Americans, the Atlantic Slave trade of Africans, the conquest of Mexicans, the colonization of Filipinos and Hawaiians, the mass importation of Chinese workers subsequently denied citizenship under the Chinese Exclusion Act: the War Machine created and then expanded the size of the United States using non-White bodies, waging war against them, and making them second-class citizens (when it deigned to make them citizens at all). Though the 13th Amendment ended legal slavery, it did not end the War Machine’s assault on Black people, which has simply morphed from slavery, sharecropping and Jim Crow segregation (see 18 Things White People Should Know), to modern day schools which are just as segregated, police violence, economic exploitation and mass incarceration. The War Machine has so effectively decimated the Black community, for example, that for the few of us who do manage to get, say, an education, it is almost meaningless as a way to move up in the world.

The Black Lives Matter movement is about more than just justice for our deaths: it’s about the depreciation of Black life in the service of accumulation of stuff for White people, from slavery to “security” to shopping. This status quo is protected, often violently, by police. And now as the War on Terror (allegedly) scales down, there is an oversupply of “stuff” used to commit violence in the name of quelling it – and an undersupply of violence to quell. The “ongoing slippage between policing and war that still visibly characterizes the present”, as the historian Nikhil Pal Singh recently observed, shouldn’t be seen as mere coincidence: it’s the War Machine coming home, and coming home as hungry as ever. -- See The Signs of Kali Yuga.

Your thoughts can be posted here.

My Sikh Sense
By S.S. SatHanuman Singh Khalsa


SatHanuman Singh Khalsa

Sat Nam, Dear Singh Sahibs and Sardarni Sahibas,

I am NOT qualified and I don't want to serve in a system which has ostracized one of its own, namely, Singh Sahib Awtar Singh Khalsa.

Therefore, I am not renewing my Sikh Dharma minister position as I don't respect or relate to the system and "leadership" which cares not for those who serve, unless they approve. It appears to me we have become an exclusive club where only money and status qualifies one for position.

I have lived and practiced this lifestyle since I was a young adult. I have experienced positive and sometimes challenging times as we all have. Some of you I know to be real human beings, but I fear the current group of SSSC Board members will not change much.

Those who have power will not let go and allow our youth to serve unless they fit their narrow assessment. Our spiritual path has been compromised by ego. Too many hard working conscious men and women have been sidelined and Yogi Bhajan is now an icon for marketing purposes. More.

My Sikh Sense
By M.S.S. Hari Singh Bird Khalsa


Hari Singh Bird Khalsa

We all fit. Or do we?

Sat Nam! Watch this video.


We can relate to the message of inclusion here,
but where's the diversity? Where are the Colored eyes?

My Sikh Sense
By Ravitej Singh Khalsa


Ravitej Singh Khalsa

Keeping In Mind The Numbers

Sat Nam. In regard to the Fareed Zakaria posting, look how many deaths have occured between the Shiites and Sunnis. Far more than any terrorist campaigns. And the Middle East has been doing the same things for 4,000 years. Nothing new. The only thing that is new is global and instant news coverage.* And the whole world loving to watch yet another soap opera. And “spin” is nothing new. Been changing history and stories for 15,000 years. What is the reality? (See Islamic Extremism versus Christian Extremism.)

Do you watch television? The shows of Shonda Rymes? Where there is no color line. And heroes and villains alike come in all colors and shades. The Evening News with color, shapes, age and orientation represented. Public television news' Grand Dame is a stout woman of color. That is what the new Gens are watching. And not seeing colors or shades. Or if they do, thinking how nice of a color that actor or actress is. It’s just the Piscean that really cares. And it’s time for that to simply die off. Armageddon time.

The old dies and the new lives differently. Guru Gobind Singh said 960 million there will be. New yoga students and teachers from the Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan tradition fast filling up that number. That’s all I care about. The future. The past is already dead. We just have to let the old skin shuck off. And it is in the numbers. More brown people everywhere in the media. Lots of them. Just have to watch a little TV to understand it’s all changing.

3HO/Sikh Dharma has to learn to keep up or be left out. That’s just the way it is for everyone -- equal opportunity. Do or die. Simple. When Siri Chand Singh was interviewed the YOUNG Punjabi Sikhs thought he was so cool. When the Black women in Texas became a Sikh so many Punjabi’s texted on her Facebook. They loved her. What does that say? It’s all happening anyway. And nothing will stop it. No matter the posturing and campaigning, the Piscean age is going to die. Easily or miserably. Gracefully or regretfully. With honor or fear. At each other, with each other, or for each other. Your choice. See Keep In Mind The Numbers. See ACT For Diversity.

*Editor's Note: It has been said that you will see everything twice if you live long enough.

My Sikh Sense
By M.S.S. Hari Singh Bird Khalsa


Hari Singh Bird Khalsa

Speaking of numbers as in Ravitej Singh's posting, check this out.

Sat Nam! For over a decade, Americans have believed that far too many deaths occur as a result of medical errors in U.S. hospitals? A report issued by the Institute of Medicine in 1999 put the number at 98,000 premature deaths per year. Now that number seems to be rising. A new study published in the Journal of Patient Safety states that the true number of premature deaths associated with preventable harm to patients is estimated at more than 400,000 per year. This number works out to be more than 1,096 deaths per day.

Question: Why is it that the American public, which gets so engaged when an airliner goes down with 200 to 300 fatalities in just one day, can accept an average of 1,096 preventable daily deaths as the result of medical errors without even a whimper let alone demands for an immediate reformation of the system? Go figure! --

See Are Drugs Making You Sick? See Texting And Driving Is Crazy. See Drinking Driving Dead. See Health Equals Happiness

My Sikh Sense
By Ravitej Singh Khalsa


Ravitej Singh Khalsa

Re: Keeping In Mind The Numbers

Sat Nam. Medical errors? My son has a prescription, and I called about its renewal to the medical center. They prepared same and had it ready...for the entirely incorrect medication, which would have been consequential. (See Previous Post.)

Always read prescriptions carefully.* And understand what the medication is supposed to be. The medical provider we go to has cut staff considerably. And those remaining are vastly overworked.

This is an issue with everything. Understaffing to feed the upper levels more profits and bonuses. The concept of 1% getting everything filters down little.

If one goes back to recent or ancient Feudal systems the same is found. And the 1% has always had access to the best current medicine. And the serfs little or no access.

Those wanting the Piscean Age to continue are working so hard to make it so. Bringing back a Feudal system is one of the ways.

The current GOP simply wants the feudal system and will do anything to achieve it. With no conscience or consciousness. --

*Editor's Note: Check out drugs online for reactions and interactions with other drugs. See Corporations Are Killing Americans.





More MySikhSense.com

                                          

                                 

See SensitivitySummit.com. See Desmond Tutu's Plea To Israel.
See The Homeless Banned And Jailed In 'Christian' America.
See Let's Have 'The Race Conversation' For Real, This Time.
See More Diversity Dialogues. See Institutionalized Racism.

See Required Reading. See Recommended Reading.
See Why Are White Tantra Yoga Classes So 'White'?

See Islamic Extremism vs Christian Extremism.

See A Native American's Thanksgiving Rebuke.
See What White People Need To Know.

See Americans Need To Pay Attention.
See What's Wrong With This Picture?
See A Case Of Unjust Enrichment.
See A Classic Case of Tribalism.
See What Tribalism Looks Like.
See Guidelines For Facilitators.
See For The People Of Color.
See What Is White Privilege?
See KRI Needs To Go To Jail.
See Jon Stewart On Racism.
See The Ubuntu Philosophy.
See TheMahanTantric.com.
See Example of Tribalism.

See ACT For Diversity.
See Comments Con.
See Comments Pro.

See Obama 43 To 1.
See My Main Point.
See Definitions.
See Questions.

    

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