ABOUT US       CONTACT US       DISCLAIMER       HOME PAGE       NEWS AND VIEWS       SEARCH       UNIVERSITY OF DIVERSITY

   

               OohRahMemorial.com                  

Semper Fidelis
A Tale of Six Boys


A Marine: No greater friend, no worse enemy.

"All gave some, some gave all.
Uncommon valor was a common virtue."

First Flag Raising


The 1st Flag Raising, Mt. Suribachi,
Iwo Jima, Japan, February 23, 1945.

Second Flag Raising


The now famous 2nd Flag Raising, Iwo Jima, Japan, February 23, 1945.
The first place an invader's flag ever flew over Japanese home territory.
The pole weighed over 100 lbs. Three of the flag raisers died on Iwo Jima.

See To The Greatest Generation...Before You Go.

The Birth of The Corps

The birthday of the United States Marine Corps, November 10, 1775, occurred when the Second Continental Congress decreed that, "two battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors and other Officers, as usual in other Regiments; that they consist of an equal number of Privates as with other Battalions, that particular care be taken that no persons be appointed to offices, or enlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve for and during the present war with Great Britain and the Colonies; unless dismissed by Congress; that they be distinguished by the names of the First and Second Battalions of Marines."

Factoid     

Samuel Nicholas was the first Commandant of the Marine Corps.

A Tale of Six Boys

"A true leader emerges only when their consciousness evolves to
the point where the individual 'me' becomes the collective 'we'."

"Each year I am hired to go to Washington, D.C., with the eighth grade class from Clinton, WI, where I grew up, to videotape their trip. I greatly enjoy visiting our nation's capitol, and each year I take some special memories back with me. This fall's trip was especially memorable.

On the last night of our trip, we stopped at the Iwo Jima Memorial. This memorial is the largest bronze statue in the world and depicts one of the most famous photographs in history by Joseph Rosenthal -- that of six Marines raising the American Flag at the top of a rocky hill on the island of Iwo Jima, Japan, during World War II.


The Iwo Jima Memorial, Washington, D.C.


The Iwo Jima Memorial, Marine Military Academy, Harlingen, Texas

Factoid     

  Iwo Jima is now known as Iwo To,
the original Japanese name of the island.

Over one hundred students and chaperones piled off the buses and headed towards the Memorial. I noticed a solitary figure at the base of the statue, and as I got closer he asked, "Where are you guys from?"

I told him that we were from Wisconsin. "Hey, I'm a cheese head, too! Come gather around, cheese heads, and I will tell you a story."

Note: James Bradley just happened to be in Washington, D.C., to speak at the Memorial the following day. He was there that night to say good night to his dad, who has since passed away. He was just about to leave when he saw the buses pull up. I videotaped him as he spoke to us, and received his permission to share what he said from my videotape. It is one thing to tour the incredible monuments filled with history in Washington, D.C., but it is quite another to get the kind of insight we received that night.

When all had gathered around, he reverently began to speak. Here are his words from that night.

"My name is James Bradley and I'm from Antigo, Wisconsin. My dad is on that statue, and I just wrote a book called "Flags of Our Fathers", which is number 5 on the New York Times Best Seller list, right now. It is the story of the six boys you see behind me.

"Six boys raised the flag. The first guy putting the pole in the ground is Harlon Block. Harlon was an all-state football player. He enlisted in the Marine Corps with all the senior members of his football team. They were off to play another type of game. A game called "War." But it didn't turn out to be a game.

Factoid          

Leadership training starts on the drill field
where group consciousness skills emerge;
where the individual me becomes the collective we;
where a leader learns to follow, obey, and command.


A war weary face on Iwo Jima.

Harlon, at the age of 21, died with his intestines in his hands. I don't say that to gross you out, I say that because there are people who stand in front of this statue and talk about the glory of war. You guys need to know that most of the boys on Iwo Jima were 17, 18, and 19 years old.

He pointed to the statue. "You see this next guy? That's Rene Gagnon from New Hampshire. If you took Rene's helmet off at the moment this photo was taken and looked in the webbing of that helmet, you would find a photograph ... a photograph of his girlfriend. Rene put that in there for protection because he was scared. He was 18 years old. Boys won the battle of Iwo Jima. Boys. Not old men.

"The next guy here, the third guy in this tableau, was Sergeant Mike Strank. Mike is my hero. He was the hero of all these guys. They called him the "old man" because he was so old. He was already 24. When Mike would motivate his boys in training camp, he didn't say, 'Let's go kill some Japanese' or 'Let's die for our country.' He knew he was talking to boys. Instead he would say, 'You do what I say, and I'll get you home to your mothers.'

"The last guy on this side of the statue is Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian from Arizona. Ira Hayes walked off Iwo Jima. He went into the White House with my dad. President Truman told him, 'You're a hero.' He told reporters, 'How can I feel like a hero when 250 of my buddies hit the island with me and only 27 of us walked off alive?' So take your class at school, 250 of you spending a year together having fun, doing everything together. Then all 250 of you hit the beach, but only 27 of your classmates walk off alive. That was Ira Hayes. He had images of horror in his mind. Ira Hayes died dead drunk, face down at the age of 32, ten years after this picture was taken.

"The next guy, going around the statue, is Franklin Sousley from Hilltop, Kentucky. A fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. His best friend, who is now 70, told me, 'Yeah, you know, we took two cows up on the porch of the Hilltop General Store. Then we strung wire across the stairs so the cows couldn't get down. Then we fed them Epsom salts. Those cows crapped all night. Yes, he was a fun-lovin' hillbilly boy. Franklin died on Iwo Jima at the age of 19. When the telegram came to tell his mother that he was dead, it went to the Hilltop General Store. A barefoot boy ran that telegram up to his mother's farm. The neighbors could hear her scream all night and into the morning. The neighbors lived a quarter of a mile away.

"The next guy, as we continue to go around the statue, is my dad, John Bradley (see historical correction below*) from Antigo, Wisconsin, where I was raised. My dad lived until 1994, but he would never give interviews. When Walter Cronkite's producers, or the New York Times would call. We were trained as little kids to say, 'No, I'm sorry, sir, my dad's not here. He is in Canada fishing. No, there is no phone there, sir. No, we don't know when he is coming back.'

"My dad never fished or even went to Canada. Usually, he was sitting there right at the table eating his Campbell's soup. But we had to tell the press that he was out fishing. He didn't want to talk to the press.

*HISTORICAL CORRECTION: The Marine Corps has determined that Pfc. Harold Schultz is the Marine mistakenly identified as Navy Corpsman John Bradley.


Pfc. Harold Schultz

June 23, 2016 -- After a three-month investigation into the Iwo Jima photograph, ordered by Marine Corps Commandant, General Robert Neller, service officials determined that Marine Private First Class (Pfc.) Harold Schultz was the sixth of the original flag-bearers, not Navy Corpsman John Bradley, as The Associated Press initially reported and which became the official history since. (Associated Press) See More.

 

When the public first demanded this stamp commemorating the Flag
Raising on Iwo Jima, the U.S. Post Postal Service initially rejected the
idea out of hand. "No living person(s) can appear on a U.S. stamp,"
they replied. But the public demand was so great that the Congress
pushed for the stamp. It was issued just five months after the Flag
Raising. On the first day of issue, people stood patiently in lines
stretching for city blocks on a sweltering July day in 1945 for
a chance to buy their beloved stamp. For many years,
this was the biggest selling stamp in the history of the
U.S. Postal Service. Over 137 million were sold.

 
'The Sands of Iwo Jima' movie premiered in 1949.
From left, Ira Hayes, John Bradley, John Wayne and Rene Gagnon.

 
This photo was taken on November 10, 1954, the
178th birthday of the United States Marine Corps.
From front left, John Bradley, Rene Gagnon,
Vice Pres. Richard Nixon, and Ira Hayes.
(Ira Hayes died three months later.)

"You see, my dad didn't see himself as a hero. Everyone thinks these guys are heroes, 'cause they are in a photo and on a monument. My dad knew better. He was a medic. John Bradley from Wisconsin was a caregiver. In Iwo Jima he probably held over 200 boys as they died. And when boys died in Iwo Jima, they writhed and screamed in pain.

"When I was a little boy, my third grade teacher told me that my dad was a hero. When I went home and told my dad that, he looked at me and said, 'I want you always to remember that the heroes of Iwo Jima are the guys who did not come back. Did NOT come back.'"

"So that's the story about six nice young boys. Three died on Iwo Jima, and three came back as national heroes. Overall, 7,000 boys died on Iwo Jima in the worst battle in the history of the Marine Corps. My voice is giving out now, so I will end here. Thank you for your time." -- See More.

MARCH 21, 2015, IOTO, Japan (AP) Source. Dozens of aging U.S. veterans, many in their early 90s and some in wheelchairs, gathered on the tiny, barren island of Iwo Jima on Saturday to mark the 70th anniversary of one of the bloodiest and most iconic battles of World War II. More than 30 veterans flown in from the U.S. island territory of Guam toured the black sand beaches where they invaded the deeply dug-in forces of the island's Japanese defenders in early 1945.

They were bused to the top of Mount Suribachi, an active volcano, where an Associated Press photo of the raising of the American flag while the battle was still raging became a potent symbol of hope and valor to a war-weary public back home that was growing increasingly disillusioned with the seemingly unending battle in the Pacific.

For some of the veterans, the return to the island where many of their comrades died, and which is still inhabited only by a contingent of Japanese military troops, brought out difficult emotions.

"I hated them," said former Sgt. John Roy Coltrane, 93, of Siler City, North Carolina. "For 40 years, I wouldn't even buy anything made in Japan. But now I drive a Honda."

Speeches at the Reunion of Honor ceremony held near the invasion beach were made by senior Japanese politicians and descendants of the few Japanese who survived the battle. Also speaking were U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Gen. Joseph Dunford, the commandant of the Marine Corps, who noted that the battle for Iwo Jima remains the "very ethos" of the Marine Corps today.

"We should never forget that the peace and prosperity of Japan and the United States at present has been built on the sacrifice of precious lives," Japanese Defense Minister Gen Nakatani said in his remarks.

This was the first time that Japanese Cabinet officials attended the anniversary ceremony, now in its 16th year. And while the presence of veterans able to make the grueling trip has been steadily dwindling, the number of participants - about 500 - was double that of last year because of the significance of the 70th year since Japan's surrender ended World War II.

After the joint memorial, the U.S. and Japanese dignitaries and guests went their separate ways to visit the parts of the island that were of the most significance to their own troops. The Japanese have erected several memorials to their dead, and in a traditional way of placating their souls poured water and placed flowers on the memorial sites.

The Marines invaded Iwo Jima in February 1945, and it was only declared secured after more than a month of fighting. About 70,000 U.S. troops fought more than 20,000 Japanese - only 216 Japanese were captured as POWs and the rest are believed to have been either killed in action or to have taken their own lives.

The island was declared secure on March 16, 1945, but skirmishes continued. In about 36 days of battle, nearly 7,000 U.S. Marines were killed and 20,000 wounded.

It is to this day considered sacred ground to many Japanese. As a haunting reminder of the ferocity of the fighting, search teams continue to dig up more and more Japanese remains each year - it's estimated that 12,000 have yet to be found.

The United States returned the island to Japan in 1968. Wreckage of military equipment can still be seen dotting some of the beach areas, along with pill boxes and extensive mazes of caves.

Though the idea of developing the island for tourism has been mulled for decades, and possibly using its natural hot springs as an attraction, the island is virtually untouched other than the small airfield used by the Japanese.

Though a tiny volcanic crag, the island - now called Ioto or Iwoto on Japanese maps - was deemed strategically important because it was being used by the Japanese to launch air attacks on American bombers. After its capture, it was used by the U.S. as an emergency landing site for B-29s, which eventually made 2,900 emergency landings there that are estimated to have saved the lives of 24,000 airmen who would have otherwise had to crash at sea.

Twenty-seven Medals of Honor were awarded for action in the battle, more than any other in U.S. military history.

The only surviving Medal of Honor recipient from Iwo Jima, Hershel "Woody" Williams, 91, attended the ceremony. Afterward, he said his feelings toward the Japanese had not changed in the decades since the battle.

"They were just doing their jobs, just like we were," he said. "We tried to kill them before they could kill us. But that's war." -- See More.

 

Factoid          

"Most of us wonder if our lives made any difference.
Marines don't have that problem." -- Ronald Reagan

General Chesty Puller

A Marine Corps Hero


General Lewis Burwell "Chesty" Puller
June 26, 1898 - October 11, 1971

Fourteen personal decorations for combat, five Navy Crosses
(the nation's second highest award for valor), one Army Distinguished
Service Cross plus a long list of campaign medals, unit citation ribbons
and other awards. These achievements sum up the exemplary 37-year
career of one of the greatest Marine legends of all time: Lieutenant
General "Chesty" Puller. He began his Marine Corps career with the
"Horse Soldiers" in China, then on to four World War II campaigns,
the Korean War, and expeditionary service in China, Nicaragua,
and Haiti. True to himself and the Corps, General Puller never was
one to mince words. "We're surrounded," he said during one battle.
"That simplifies the problem."

Semper Fi



The Marine Corps Hymn

The most recognizable military hymn and the oldest official song in the U.S. Armed Forces, The Marines' Hymn is a reminder of the sacrifice and courage that Marines have shown on the battlefield. It is an important part of Marine Corps culture—every Marine can recite its three stanzas by heart.

From the Halls of Montezuma,
To the shores of Tripoli;
We fight our country's battles
In the air, on land, and sea;
First to fight for right and freedom
And to keep our honor clean:
We are proud to claim the title
Of United States Marine.

Our flag's unfurled to every breeze
From dawn to setting sun;
We have fought in every clime and place
Where we could take a gun;
In the snow of far-off Northern lands
And in sunny tropic scenes;
You will find us always on the job
The United States Marines.

Here's health to you and to our Corps
Which we are proud to serve;
In many a strife we've fought for life
And never lost our nerve;
If the Army and the Navy
Ever look on Heaven's scenes;
They will find the streets are guarded
By The United States Marines.

The Marine Corps Standard Lexicon

Starboard: Right
Port: Left
Deck: Floor
Porthole: Window
Bulkhead: Wall
Galley: Kitchen
Sick Bay: Medical Office
Overhead: Ceilings
Mess: Dining Area
Head: Restroom
Passageway: Hallway
Scuttlebutt: Water Fountain

The Marine Rifleman's Creed

This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will…

My rifle and myself know that what counts in this war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit...

My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will ever guard it against the ravages of weather and damage as I will ever guard my legs, my arms, my eyes and my heart against damage. I will keep my rifle clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will...

Before God, I swear this creed. My rifle and myself are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life. So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but peace! -- See "Before You Go!"

      

Keep Up

The Sign

Freedom

Memorial

The Salute

God's Web

Dress Blues

A Love Story

Khalsa Power

Patriotic Photos

For Marines Only

The Marine Sniper

SEAL The Mission

The Memorial Rock

Iwo Jima - The Battle

Born Again American

America The Beautiful

A Native American Hero

Christmastime Arlington

Delta Airline Honor Guard

The Sikh Warrior's Anthem

The Meaning of 'Semper Fi'

America's National Anthem

The After-Death Experience

The Greatest Story Never Told

A Tale of Six Boys On Iwo Jima

Look, Listen and Experience Peace

For Men Only: MasculineMoments.com

How The Marines Transform Me Into We

Museum of The American Military Family

To The Greatest Generation...Before You Go

U.S. Marine Corps Silent Drill Team With Rifles



More Web sites by
KhalsaWebMasters.com

SAAAP.org Dieterata.com
HariBird.com HariSingh.com
SopaRice.com SikhSongs.com
SopaSeca.com NarayanOil.com
UbuntuAge.com 3HOHistory.com
LivtarSingh.com YogiMethod.com
WhaHeGuru.com IsolatedSeer.com
SikhAnthem.com MySixSense.com
OngKarKaur.com 13EkOngKar.com
BroadPoints.com ChardeeKala.com
EkOngKar13.com SoothingSpa.com
Obama43To1.com DalpremKaur.com
HariKaurBird.com SPIRITofGRD.com
OpticalViews.com LakeKillarney.com
KhalsaVision.com VaninderKaur.com
GuruRamDas.com HariSinghBird.com
MahanTantric.com RamDasSingh.com
MySikhSense.com
SikhDharma13.com
BigotDetector.com
BeYourAllness.com
3DDispensing.com
LandOfAwwws.com
Interior-Guard.com SatKartarSingh.com
OpticalCourse.com DrRamonIbarra.com
MiriPiriWarrior.com HariKaurKhalsa.com
SatNamMeans.com 1Plus1Equals11.com
KaliYugaSigns.com OpticianryToday.com
SiriSinghSahib.com JustAddedWater.com
CloseOrderDrill.com WordPhysiology.com
1And1Equals11.com EyewearMoodys.com
RamDhanSingh.com HariSinghKhalsa.com
HangupsByHari.com PreetKaurKhalsa.com
DownWithCarbs.com
WhiteTantraYoga.com
ACTForDiversity.com TheMahanTantric.com
AdiShaktiMantra.com WirelessAndFree.com
ScienceOfMantra.com WhoAreTheSikhs.com
OohRahMemorial.com OpticianryReview.com
WeProcessLoans.com OpticalGuidelines.com
GurdwaraSecurity.com GuruGobindSingh.com
DiversityDialogues.org OpticalWorkshops.com
AmarSinghKhalsa.com KirpalSinghKhalsa.com
SensitivitySummit.com SatpalSinghKhalsa.com
SurvivalCampUSA.com SadhanaGuidelines.com
AwtarSinghKhalsa.com YouAreTheEssence.com
KhalsaWebMasters.com KundaliniYogapedia.com
MasculineMoments.com StFrancisOfficePark.com
AdhocCommittee13.com ToTheSweetestMom.com
DegTeghFatehYatra.com YogiBhajansTeacher.com
ToTheSweetestWife.com OpticalShiftHappens.com
HairInLaysTheTruth.com AllForOneWonForAll.com
EachMomentIsAGift.com MyInterviewWithGod.com
OpticiansForChange.com DrinkingDrivingDead.com
HappinessIsTheRule.com ToServeIsToSucceed.com
AtTheFeetOfTheYogi.com SaTaNaMaMeditation.com
SameDayCounseling.com ServingVersusSelling.com
SiriGuruGranthSahib.com SukhmaniKaurKhalsa.com
UniversityOfDiversity.com ForThePeopleOfColor.com
RaMaDaSaMeditation.com
LakesideManorOnline.com
YogiTeaByYogiBhajan.com DispensingGuidelines.com
CourageousDialogues.com EyeWearProfessionals.com
SatKriyaByYogiBhajan.com SecurityAdvisoryTeam.com
IfYouKnowWhoYouAre.com ReligionDemographics.com
EyeExaminationOnline.com TimeForCraftsmanship.com
GlassesOnlineWarning.com YogiBhajanWeLoveYou.com
IDoNotEatDeadAnimals.com FirstSikhOfSikhDharma.com
MoreThanYouCanKnow.com HealthEqualsHappiness.com
OpticiansForThePeople.com GoodGuysWearTurbans.com
OnsiteFamilyHealthcare.com AquarianAgeBeganHere.com
SantSipahiAdvisoryTeam.com FirstTeachersAreWomen.com
KirtanKriyaByYogiBhajan.com SugarIsAFourLetterWord.com
SatHanumanSinghKhalsa.com TheAfterDeathExperience.com
TextingAndDrivingIsCrazy.com AdhocCommitteeThirteen.com
TheReverseMortgageLady.com OneAndOneEqualsEleven.com
WordsOfWisdomAndHumor.com IAmABornAgainAmerican.com
CrucifixionByAnEyewitness.com TestYourKnowledgeOnline.com
BhaiSahibSatpalSinghKhalsa.com LifeAccordingToYogiBhajan.com
GodAndMeMeAndGodAreOne.com NowYouKnowThatYouKnow.com
ReachOutAndTouchSomebody.com KundaliniYogaByYogiBhajan.com
TheTechnologyOfConsciousness.com IfYourDadDoesntHaveABeard.com
ConsciousCommunicationGuidelines.com EkOngKarSatNamSiriWhaHeGuru.com

   ®
Khalsa

WebMasters.com
© All rights reserved.

drupal analytics

 

 

ABOUT US       CONTACT US       DISCLAIMER       HOME PAGE       NEWS AND VIEWS       SEARCH       UNIVERSITY OF DIVERSITY